20 Lines A Day

A Community of Writers and Photographers

Snickers Closeup 2


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CHOCOLATE GOODIES

Snickers Closeup 2For this post I am sharing many different jobs related to chocolate. Although the color of chocolate was fairly unexciting, I discovered there were infinite varieties of brown. In fact, I mixed almost every color on my palette together in order to find them.

I began my career by making paintings that resembled photos. Now I work digitally by using photos and making them look like paintings!

These squares represent my digital work and are fairly recent.

These squares represent my digital work and are fairly recent. This is only a layout, which was gleaned from my photo reference. The painting that followed was more “illustrated.”

This is a marker sketch

This is a marker sketch.

I always like to share my process with lines sketches.

I always like to share my process with lines sketches. The texture for those curls varied considerably between jobs.

Choc. Curls  2When illustrating chocolate curls and squares, there was never an end to art direction for tone and color.

Probably one of my first paintings that propelled me toward being a food illustrator was my Nestle Crunch Bar. It was painted in my last year of college and I learned how hard it was to hand-letter writing on the wrapper. But I loved the broken chocolate texture.

My painting

My painting.

This was the photo that I followed for my reference.

This was the photo that I followed as my reference.

This is a close up of the broken chocolate.

This is a close up of the broken chocolate.

I made a promotional postcard using this image. A decade later, I decided to paint a more exciting candy bar. This time I chose a Snicker’s Bar. Thankfully, I discovered a process to work with lettering that was more precise, although it still required painstaking detail and planning.Snicker's Bar

My photo reference.

My photo reference.

Snicker's Sketch

I also had postcards made with this image and it was great for getting jobs. Art directors told me it made them hungry.

This label shows how a lot of detail is lost in the printing process. I was disappointed with how my painting looked.

This label shows how a lot of detail is lost in the printing process. I was disappointed with how my painting looked.

I was told to remove this tiny drip.

I was told to remove this tiny drip.

This is a marker sketch and not the final painting.

This is a marker sketch and not the final painting.

In 1992, I won an award from the Society Of Illustrators of Los Angeles for my Snicker’s bar illustration.

My Snicker’s bar was such an excellent promotion piece that it led to a job illustrating a label for a Balance Bar. I wasn’t allowed to do drips for this painting and I sure missed them. At the end of this post, I’ll share more close-ups of the caramel and chocolate I loved painting.Little Debbies Little Debbie's CremesPeanut Clusters line

This was my layout.

This was my layout.

There is definitely an "art" to taking a bite out of something I'm illustrating.

There is definitely an “art” to taking a bite out of something I’m illustrating.

Early in my career, I painted four labels for Little Debbie’s Snack Cakes. Once again, painting chocolate was fun and I had to resist snacking on my photo reference. Taking bites out of items was a whole other technique I developed!

The texture for chocolate definitely varied depending upon the product I was illustrating. Combining it with caramel or crispy rice, or shaving it for a curl was certainly different. And splashing, melted chocolate was probably the most difficult thing of all to illustrate.Caravellas line Peanut Bars

So for this post, as I share many different jobs that related to chocolate I also share one that was not successful. It was for a chocolate-raspberry product. The line sketch for my art direction looks fairly straightforward. The actual product was dark inside and not very appealing. My final artwork was my best effort, but ultimately was rejected by the client and I was only partially paid.Choc-rasp layout

This product was pretty challenging. I illustrated the raspberries separately.

This product was pretty challenging. I illustrated the raspberries separately.

I was told to put raspberries seeds in there.

I was told to put raspberries seeds in there and lighten the filling in contrast with the darker chocolate.

A fairly recent job of mine was for Kirkland/Costco. The illustration was for chocolate calcium chews. I share below my photo reference for the chews. I never liked illustrating splashes and was relieved that this one worked.Layout w. Kirkland Calcium Chews lines

On this one, I had a lot of photo reference to choose from.

On this one, I had a lot of photo reference to choose from.

Some of these paintings were rendered with markers and colored pencils and others were created with watercolor dyes. I have a blog where I describe my technique and have a lot more information. It is at: 

http://foodartist.wordpress.com

This is a super close-up of the texture on my Snicker's painting.

This is a super close-up of the texture on my Snicker’s painting.

Snickers Closeup 1

© 2014 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


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A BUNCH OF CHERRIES

Cherry Group with Leaf

I am a food illustrator and have illustrated a lot of fruit. For this post I am sharing cherries. Cherries had challenges with the long and thin stems, which needed to be delicate and smooth. The dimension of a cherry was created with a bottom shadow and simple highlight.Cherries and Leaf Cherries A

It was important that the highlight wasn’t too perfect or the cherry would look like plastic. The cherries I illustrated were either bright red or a dark magenta to indicate “black cherry” flavor. Cherry leaves were interesting to paint because they had very serrated edges.Cherries Four Cherry Group Red Cherry Bunch 1 Cherry and Vanilla Cherries-Horizontal Group Cherries Cropped

For fun, I share a large fruit illustration that includes cherries. It was large because it would wrap around a jar for a jam label. The art director requested that my painting be done in a certain style.  I had to follow a certain color and texture for the leaves. And, I was told to have harsh shadows. Normally, I use reflected light on the edges of fruit and never let the shadow reach the edge. The effect was definitely interesting for me!Stylized Fruit Medley Fruit style w. cherry 3 Fruit style w. cherry 2 Fruit style w. cherry 1

My cherry illustrations were used on labels for yogurt, juice, jam and liqueur. There is one painting that was very unusual because it was for train car rentals.Take your pick Northland cherry label Mountain Sun Cherry Label Wegmans Cherry

I never liked painting clear liquid, but this painting was my best effort that I was pleased with. Close up Splash Cherry SplashSome of these paintings were rendered with markers and colored pencils and others were created with watercolor dyes. All of these paintings were done before Photoshop existed. I have a blog where I describe my technique and have a lot more information. It is at: 

http://foodartist.wordpress.com

© 2014 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Ponderosa Lemon


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CITRUS FRUIT

Ponderosa Lemon

I have been a food artist for over 30 years.

Yellow Grapefruit ClusterLemon Final Tangerine Group

I have many illustrations of citrus fruit, and have already shared a post of just oranges. So now I’m sharing lemons, limes, tangerines and grapefruits. (I threw in one orange and a few strawberries).

Lime Peel 1 Peel Yellow

I enjoy rendering citrus fruit. I start by creating a pattern of circles and “half moons” that radiate from the highlight area to replicate the citrus peel texture.

Orange Group 1 Key Lime Final Strawberry-Lemon FinalLimes Lemon  Lemon groupGrapefruit Pink    Lemon Group of 7Grapefruit & Tangerine

The illustrations for this post were used on labels for beverages, popsicles and jam.

Some of them were rendered with markers and colored pencils while others were created with watercolor dyes. The peel texture was created using acrylics and a glazing technique, which I describe on my other blog at this link:

http://foodartist.wordpress.com/2010/05/31/317/

 Grapefruit YellowGrapefruit Pink with BlossomsLemon D

© 2013 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com  http://foodartist.wordpress.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


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LETTUCE EAT SALAD

Salad Tossed

For over thirty years, I’ve illustrated food. I wanted to name my post “turning over a new leaf,” because I’ve embraced music as my passion now. But I chose a different title because I am still illustrating food. I also enjoy sharing the many illustrations that I have created over the course of my career.

Not a salad, but colorful and fun to share. This illustration was commissioned for a cafeteria company.

Not a salad, but colorful and fun to share. This illustration was commissioned for a cafeteria company.

For me, illustrating salad was a joy. The textures and colors intrigued me and reference was readily available. The challenges for me were the non-organic elements, such as bowls, plates, and bottles. Two of the earliest jobs of my career were for California’s Iceberg Lettuce Commission. I created two posters and later on a brochure.Salad Poster

The instructions for those illustrations were clearly outlined by the art. It was always helpful for me to receive such precise instructions to follow. Below, I share examples of marker sketches that were very important before I proceeded to final paintings. I hated to make changes to final art and the marker sketch gave me useful feedback, as well as reassuring the clients as to how my illustration would appear.

This is an example of another usage for my illustration purchased through a stock agency.

This is an example of another usage for my illustration purchased through a stock agency.

This is an example of my salad poster painting in progress. It was actually a teaching example from the time when I was an instructor.

This painting in progress shows my watercolor technique. I did this as an example when I was an art instructor.

This is a marker sketch.

This is a marker sketch.

Salad Bar

This is the printed poster.

This is the printed poster.

On a project for Borden, I photographed my own hand – I thought it would be easy to create the fingernail, even though I didn’t have a long one. The art director made a comment, “Hand looks too heavy, can you make it more slender?” OUCH!Salad Borden comp Borden Comp w. Comments Salad Dressing Bordens

I especially enjoyed working for Ready Pac, Co. My first illustration was for their Spinach Salad Kit. I was only required to illustrate the package elements, not the salad.I completed the marker comp and received delayed feedback that the dressing needed to be lighter and more translucent. The client wanted the spices to be visibly floating in the dressing. I had already begun painting, so I stopped what I was working on and began again. I had to take new reference photos to help me. Solving the texture for the croutons was fun for me. I used colored pencils to achieve the “roughness.”
Ready pac Labels

I always gave my clients choices with sketches. It's much easier with a computer now!

I always gave my clients choices with sketches. It’s much easier with a computer now!

I ended up making the dressing more transluscent.

I ended up making the dressing more transluscent.

This is a marker sketch.

This is a marker sketch.

An example of my photo reference.

An example of my photo reference.

Ready Pac Spinach

Subsequent jobs for Ready Pac incorporated my own unique digital process. I worked with my computer to create something that I could lightly print out onto watercolor paper. I painted over the print with watercolors.

Caesar Lite Asian Salad kit art Asian

Parisian salad kit art

ParisianSalad Trays Ready Pak

I share now more illustrations for salad packaging that I created over the span of my career.

Salad Sensations Henri's dressing

An example of my job layout.

An example of my job layout.

A close up.

A close up.

Salad Horiz Best Foods dressing 

I have a lot more information about my illustration career on my blog “Illustrating My Life,” which can be found at this link:

http://foodartist.wordpress.com/

 

© 2013 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. 


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ORANGES ARE APPEALING

 

Oranges with Center BlossomFor over thirty years, I’ve illustrated food. I loved the challenge of rendering fruit; each variety had beautiful colors and textures to capture. All of these paintings were done before Photoshop existed.Orange Border Orange Frame Orange, Wedge, and BlossomOrange Stock Usage

With citrus fruit and oranges, I created a pattern of circles and “half moons” that radiated from the highlight in order to replicate the orange peel texture.

Orange, Wedge, & Blossom

Appealing

This is one of my earliest watercolors of oranges for Sundance Beverages. It is purely with watercolor and doesn't utilize the acrylic glazing that I developed later on.

This is one of my earliest watercolors of oranges for Sundance Beverages. It is purely with watercolor and doesn’t utilize the acrylic glazing that I developed later on.

I have so many illustrations of citrus fruit, that I am dividing them into categories and plan to share lemons, limes and grapefruits on another post.

Orange CremeOrange CarrotOrange Carrot Label Southern Home

The illustrations I am sharing below were primarily used on labels for orange juice. The others were used for beverages, baby food, Popsicles and jam.

Orange drink  Orange Whole with Wedge and HalfOrange Group Orange Group 1 Oranges with leaves

Most of these paintings were rendered with markers and colored pencils and others were created with watercolor dyes. I share more about creating the orange peel texture using airbrush acrylics and a glazing technique at my other blog link below:

http://foodartist.wordpress.com/2010/05/31/317/

 

© 2013 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


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FAVORITE FLORALS – PART 2

Bridal Bouquet close up

For this post, I am sharing some of my favorite floral paintings. I begin with an illustration of a rose bouquet that was used on the cover of a paperback romance novel. I have included the art director’s layout, as well as the printed book cover.

Layout Bouquet Bridal Bouquet Avon - Bridal

When I illustrated a billboard for Conroy’s Flowers, I painted each letter approximately 10 inches tall. I photographed numerous trays of flowers to serve as photo reference and created collages from those photos to assist me.Conroys Conroy's 2 letters
Conroy's close up 4 copy Conroy's close up 3 copy Conroy's close up 2 copy Conroy's close up 1 copy

My illustrations of six floral groups below, were printed on vinyl that adhered to windows. The company that commissioned them was called “Color Clings.”Color Clings 1 Camelia Group

GladiolasPansy Group Lily Group Iris GroupTulips-Yellow Group

These other paintings are from miscellaneous commercial assignments over the course of my art career.

Azalea Group Bouquet Tropical Bouquet with Daisies Roses
Rose Coral Hibiscus Flowers

My technique for these paintings involved markers, watercolors, dyes and/or colored pencils; these were created before Photoshop existed. I have a blog where I describe my technique and have a lot more information. It is at: 

http://foodartist.wordpress.com

© 2013 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


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FAVORITE FLORALS – PART 1

Flower MedleyI have always loved illustrating flowers. Using watercolor/dyes, I loved replicating exquisite colors and textures. Sometimes, a touch of colored pencil added details that worked perfectly. I was also captivated by the beauty of water droplets.People Mag close up 2 People Mag Super closeup Flower Medley closeup 2

My first floral painting was inspired by a photo that I saw in a magazine. It was a wonderful exercise for me. After that, I worked solely from my own photography. The second painting was commissioned by People Magazine twenty years ago. Later on in my career, both of these paintings were marketed as posters. It was not a lucrative venture at all, but was definitely exciting for me to have prints to display of my work. I share below my job layout, drawings, printed pieces and my photo reference.

Flower Medley closeup 1

Flower Medley closeup 3 Flower Medley Sketch

My job layout for People Magazine. I rendered the graduation tassel and hat separately.

The art director’s layout for my People Magazine floral illustration. I rendered the graduation tassel and hat separately.

People Mag People Mag People Mag close up 1

I did not notice that this flower was missing a petal when I painted it!

I did not notice that this flower was missing a petal when I painted it!

My actual photo reference.

My actual photo reference.

NY Graphics Poster

Both of these paintings were done before Photoshop existed. I have a blog where I describe my technique and have a lot more information. It is at: 

http://foodartist.wordpress.com

© Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

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