20 Lines A Day

A Community of Writers and Photographers

Burgers Messy - Two


BURGERS AND HOT DOGS

Cheeseburger Tall

For over thirty years, I’ve illustrated food. I’ve enjoyed sharing jobs from my career. For this post my images are of hot dogs and burgers.

The first hamburger above was done for my portfolio at the very beginning of my career. I painted it with watercolors. I used a photo on a puzzle box as my reference and the bun was very yellow. Later on, it was always best for me to use my own photos.

I knew that even the messiest food could be fixed when it was illustrated.

I might have done a good job illustrating this, but preparing perfect burgers was too hard! This is my photo reference an AM/PM poster job.

Thank God I wasn’t a food photographer; preparing perfect burgers was hard! This is my photo reference for an AM/PM poster job.

I usually took my photos outdoors because I preferred the lighting.

I usually took my photos outdoors because I preferred the lighting.

Painting sesame seeds were challenging because I masked out every single one of them using rubber cement.

Burgers Messy - Two

Eventually, I painted those seeds using acrylic and it was much easier. Because opaque mediums have an inherent bluish tone, it was best to still use the masking fluid and then the acrylic would clean up any mistakes.

AMPM Burgers AMPM Hotdog

 

Jobs to make burgers and hot dogs more attractive were done for AM/PM Arco Mini-markets and Orange Julius. Reading all the comments from the art director on my marker layout had me working hard. An artist’s conception was a euphemism for fooling the customers. My job was to make the product look a lot better than it really did!

This is a preliminary marker sketch.

This is a preliminary marker sketch.

A lot of comments on that tissue overlay. Clicking on the image makes them easier to read.

A lot of comments on that tissue overlay. Clicking on the image makes them easier to read.

The process of illustrating a poster for Orange Julius starts with the job layout, my photo reference shot, marker sketch and final art.

OJ Hot Dog layout OJ Hot Dog ref

Marker sketch - in some ways I like it better than the watercolor version.

Marker sketch – in some ways I like it better than the watercolor version.

The bun on the final art was lighter and less colorful. (Probably more edible in appearance that way)

The bun on the final art was lighter and less colorful. (Probably more edible in appearance that way) Notice the biggest difference – a bigger hot dog than bun. Not true!!!

I have included many marker comps for this post because in some cases I have no other copies; the client kept the final art. For the Del Monte relish labels, my marker renderings are fairly close to how the final art looked. The marker rendering of a grill was done for one of my agents to help me obtain more marker jobs. Later on in my career, I used markers for many final illustrations when time was tight.

Del Monte Relish Delmonte Hotdog Comp Del Monte Burger Comp BBQ Grill

On my Sandwich Post I shared a fabric that was called “Deli print.” Well, I also have a burger fabric. Someone else designed it and included Sloppy Joes, which I never even painted; but they did use the same buns and sesame seeds!

Burger Fabric

I actually illustrated a burger for a financial company. The price sign stuck in the burger was not helpful when I wanted to use the image for my stock agencies. I was able to digitally remove it. The prices for that burger went up over time. Unfortunately, that hasn’t happened for illustrators. If I receive prices for my art like I did twenty years ago, I’m very happy!

Griffin Burger

This was my preliminary marker sketch.

This was my preliminary marker sketch.

I'm throwing this image in from a menu. More sesame seeds for me to paint. Notice that great price - it fits in about how burger prices have risen!

I’m throwing this image in from a menu. Notice that great price – it fits in with the illustration above it showing how burger prices have risen!

Glad i could take off the price tag.

Glad I could take off the price tag.

I have a lot more information about my illustration career on my blog “Illustrating My Life,” which can be found at this link: http://foodartist.wordpress.com/

© 2014 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Snickers Closeup 2


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CHOCOLATE GOODIES

Snickers Closeup 2For this post I am sharing many different jobs related to chocolate. Although the color of chocolate was fairly unexciting, I discovered there were infinite varieties of brown. In fact, I mixed almost every color on my palette together in order to find them.

I began my career by making paintings that resembled photos. Now I work digitally by using photos and making them look like paintings!

These squares represent my digital work and are fairly recent.

These squares represent my digital work and are fairly recent. This is only a layout, which was gleaned from my photo reference. The painting that followed was more “illustrated.”

This is a marker sketch

This is a marker sketch.

I always like to share my process with lines sketches.

I always like to share my process with lines sketches. The texture for those curls varied considerably between jobs.

Choc. Curls  2When illustrating chocolate curls and squares, there was never an end to art direction for tone and color.

Probably one of my first paintings that propelled me toward being a food illustrator was my Nestle Crunch Bar. It was painted in my last year of college and I learned how hard it was to hand-letter writing on the wrapper. But I loved the broken chocolate texture.

My painting

My painting.

This was the photo that I followed for my reference.

This was the photo that I followed as my reference.

This is a close up of the broken chocolate.

This is a close up of the broken chocolate.

I made a promotional postcard using this image. A decade later, I decided to paint a more exciting candy bar. This time I chose a Snicker’s Bar. Thankfully, I discovered a process to work with lettering that was more precise, although it still required painstaking detail and planning.Snicker's Bar

My photo reference.

My photo reference.

Snicker's Sketch

I also had postcards made with this image and it was great for getting jobs. Art directors told me it made them hungry.

This label shows how a lot of detail is lost in the printing process. I was disappointed with how my painting looked.

This label shows how a lot of detail is lost in the printing process. I was disappointed with how my painting looked.

I was told to remove this tiny drip.

I was told to remove this tiny drip.

This is a marker sketch and not the final painting.

This is a marker sketch and not the final painting.

In 1992, I won an award from the Society Of Illustrators of Los Angeles for my Snicker’s bar illustration.

My Snicker’s bar was such an excellent promotion piece that it led to a job illustrating a label for a Balance Bar. I wasn’t allowed to do drips for this painting and I sure missed them. At the end of this post, I’ll share more close-ups of the caramel and chocolate I loved painting.Little Debbies Little Debbie's CremesPeanut Clusters line

This was my layout.

This was my layout.

There is definitely an "art" to taking a bite out of something I'm illustrating.

There is definitely an “art” to taking a bite out of something I’m illustrating.

Early in my career, I painted four labels for Little Debbie’s Snack Cakes. Once again, painting chocolate was fun and I had to resist snacking on my photo reference. Taking bites out of items was a whole other technique I developed!

The texture for chocolate definitely varied depending upon the product I was illustrating. Combining it with caramel or crispy rice, or shaving it for a curl was certainly different. And splashing, melted chocolate was probably the most difficult thing of all to illustrate.Caravellas line Peanut Bars

So for this post, as I share many different jobs that related to chocolate I also share one that was not successful. It was for a chocolate-raspberry product. The line sketch for my art direction looks fairly straightforward. The actual product was dark inside and not very appealing. My final artwork was my best effort, but ultimately was rejected by the client and I was only partially paid.Choc-rasp layout

This product was pretty challenging. I illustrated the raspberries separately.

This product was pretty challenging. I illustrated the raspberries separately.

I was told to put raspberries seeds in there.

I was told to put raspberries seeds in there and lighten the filling in contrast with the darker chocolate.

A fairly recent job of mine was for Kirkland/Costco. The illustration was for chocolate calcium chews. I share below my photo reference for the chews. I never liked illustrating splashes and was relieved that this one worked.Layout w. Kirkland Calcium Chews lines

On this one, I had a lot of photo reference to choose from.

On this one, I had a lot of photo reference to choose from.

Some of these paintings were rendered with markers and colored pencils and others were created with watercolor dyes. I have a blog where I describe my technique and have a lot more information. It is at: 

http://foodartist.wordpress.com

This is a super close-up of the texture on my Snicker's painting.

This is a super close-up of the texture on my Snicker’s painting.

Snickers Closeup 1

© 2014 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


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Into the Light, Where You Belong

Smell of mold
and musty leaves
raindrops on the windshield
in the still-dark dawn

linger in the depths
of darkness and desire,
where your spirit most
yearns to be free

where the long-held
confinement has rendered you
listless and lifeless

crazy before the eyes of man
yet pure in your creative depth,

where the Wise Woman,
flowing silver hair,
adorned in robes
of lavender

holds open the door
for you and cries,
“Lay down your arms!

Fight no more,
grieve no more,
die no more.

Walk into the Light,
where you belong.”

©SpiritLed 2014


Goddess Rising

The energy in here is changing, she says, as she takes a drag
from her cigarette.  No sooner have the words fallen from her lips,

than a strong, cold wind blows open the door, whips around the
room, and knocks the cigarette out of her hand.  There before her,

in a swirling mass of lavender and ghostly white, hovers her greatest
love and her greatest fear.  In familiar solidarity, she opens herself

and feels the familiar rising from her pelvis, filing her abdomen with
white light, rising to her heart, radiating out to fill the room, moving

through her arms and legs, projecting beams of light from her feet and
hands, moving up to her throat, madly sounding a beautiful and foreign song

with her own voice, rising all the way up to her crown, emanating from the
top of her head, rising and churning and radiating within and around her,

spreading her farther and wider,  expanding and creating, out into the street,
the town, the planet, the stars, the moon, until she again becomes one with

 All There Is

© SpiritLed 2014 (http://wp.me/p2Ptur-6g)


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CANDYLAND – PART 1

Brach Candy Medley

I have already shared my illustration of Brach candies on 20 Lines. This painting was one I did for my own purposes – I call it a “portfolio piece.” Illustrating candy was enjoyable for me. I appreciated how colorful, reflective and tempting those items were that I was painting. I share below my illustration process with a painting I abandoned, photo reference and some close-ups.

Candy Medley in progress Candy Medley close up 2 Candy Medley close up 1 Candy closeup 2 

My own photo that I chose to work from.

My own photo that I chose to work from.

Creating portfolio paintings to showcase my ability led to paying jobs. My Brach candy portfolio painting brought me many other illustration assignments involving candy. For Part 1 of this post, I share some of those other candy jobs.

This is my photo reference pinned to a board.

This is my photo reference pinned to a board.

This is a marker sketch.

This is a marker sketch.

Taking my photo reference was also a creative process. When I illustrated a chocolate drop called “Dittos” I set up the candy on a board and pinned each one in a different perspective. Above is my photo reference for that assignment and the marker layout I created from it. I don’t have a scan of the final art or printed label for this job.

Looks like they picked "B."

Looks like they picked “B.” (Less drippy, though)

Creme de Menthe

Looks like "B" is the winner again!

Looks like “B” is the winner again! (This time it was drippy)

Creme de Menthe

Not as delicious, for sure!

I’m glad I could improve upon my photo!

I became adept at illustrating mint leaves and could do them from memory. Mint and chocolate were definitely an interesting contrast of dark and light. I am sharing many different mint-related illustrations and I’m even including a few line sketches.

That leaf needed a lot of improvement!

That leaf needed a lot of improvement!

Mint - Dubouchett Peppermint

A printed version of the mint.

A printed version of the mint.

Below are some miscellaneous jobs. Colorful candies like my cinnamon and butterscotch illustrations were far more exciting to illustrate than those brown root beer barrels. But I was proud of how realistic they were.

Butterscotch Hot Cinnamon Fruit Dinosaurs Root Beer Candies

And my broken chocolate egg for Dove was extremely difficult because of the embossed lettering on top. I only have the marker sketch below from that particular job.

Comp DoveOne day, I actually did receive an illustration assignment for Brach Candies. Thankfully by then, I had learned how to create rub-down letters through a photographic process to use on the wrappers. It was a relief that I didn’t have to paint those tiny letters with a brush!

 

This black and white photo-copy was the used to create a negative. Then rub-down letters could be made from it. With computers now it's far easier than it used to be!

This black and white photo-copy was the used to create a negative. Then rub-down letters could be made from it. With computers now it’s far easier than it used to be!

 

This is a color photo-copy of the final art showing the lettering on it.

This is a color photo-copy of the final art showing the lettering on it.

 

This is a color copy of a preliminary marker sketch.

This is a color copy of a preliminary marker sketch.

I have a blog where I describe my technique and have a lot more information. It is at:

http://foodartist.wordpress.com

  -

© Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


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A BUNCH OF CHERRIES

Cherry Group with Leaf

I am a food illustrator and have illustrated a lot of fruit. For this post I am sharing cherries. Cherries had challenges with the long and thin stems, which needed to be delicate and smooth. The dimension of a cherry was created with a bottom shadow and simple highlight.Cherries and Leaf Cherries A

It was important that the highlight wasn’t too perfect or the cherry would look like plastic. The cherries I illustrated were either bright red or a dark magenta to indicate “black cherry” flavor. Cherry leaves were interesting to paint because they had very serrated edges.Cherries Four Cherry Group Red Cherry Bunch 1 Cherry and Vanilla Cherries-Horizontal Group Cherries Cropped

For fun, I share a large fruit illustration that includes cherries. It was large because it would wrap around a jar for a jam label. The art director requested that my painting be done in a certain style.  I had to follow a certain color and texture for the leaves. And, I was told to have harsh shadows. Normally, I use reflected light on the edges of fruit and never let the shadow reach the edge. The effect was definitely interesting for me!Stylized Fruit Medley Fruit style w. cherry 3 Fruit style w. cherry 2 Fruit style w. cherry 1

My cherry illustrations were used on labels for yogurt, juice, jam and liqueur. There is one painting that was very unusual because it was for train car rentals.Take your pick Northland cherry label Mountain Sun Cherry Label Wegmans Cherry

I never liked painting clear liquid, but this painting was my best effort that I was pleased with. Close up Splash Cherry SplashSome of these paintings were rendered with markers and colored pencils and others were created with watercolor dyes. All of these paintings were done before Photoshop existed. I have a blog where I describe my technique and have a lot more information. It is at: 

http://foodartist.wordpress.com

© 2014 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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