20 Lines A Day

A Community of Writers and Photographers

Snickers Closeup 2


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CHOCOLATE GOODIES

Snickers Closeup 2For this post I am sharing many different jobs related to chocolate. Although the color of chocolate was fairly unexciting, I discovered there were infinite varieties of brown. In fact, I mixed almost every color on my palette together in order to find them.

I began my career by making paintings that resembled photos. Now I work digitally by using photos and making them look like paintings!

These squares represent my digital work and are fairly recent.

These squares represent my digital work and are fairly recent. This is only a layout, which was gleaned from my photo reference. The painting that followed was more “illustrated.”

This is a marker sketch

This is a marker sketch.

I always like to share my process with lines sketches.

I always like to share my process with lines sketches. The texture for those curls varied considerably between jobs.

Choc. Curls  2When illustrating chocolate curls and squares, there was never an end to art direction for tone and color.

Probably one of my first paintings that propelled me toward being a food illustrator was my Nestle Crunch Bar. It was painted in my last year of college and I learned how hard it was to hand-letter writing on the wrapper. But I loved the broken chocolate texture.

My painting

My painting.

This was the photo that I followed for my reference.

This was the photo that I followed as my reference.

This is a close up of the broken chocolate.

This is a close up of the broken chocolate.

I made a promotional postcard using this image. A decade later, I decided to paint a more exciting candy bar. This time I chose a Snicker’s Bar. Thankfully, I discovered a process to work with lettering that was more precise, although it still required painstaking detail and planning.Snicker's Bar

My photo reference.

My photo reference.

Snicker's Sketch

I also had postcards made with this image and it was great for getting jobs. Art directors told me it made them hungry.

This label shows how a lot of detail is lost in the printing process. I was disappointed with how my painting looked.

This label shows how a lot of detail is lost in the printing process. I was disappointed with how my painting looked.

I was told to remove this tiny drip.

I was told to remove this tiny drip.

This is a marker sketch and not the final painting.

This is a marker sketch and not the final painting.

In 1992, I won an award from the Society Of Illustrators of Los Angeles for my Snicker’s bar illustration.

My Snicker’s bar was such an excellent promotion piece that it led to a job illustrating a label for a Balance Bar. I wasn’t allowed to do drips for this painting and I sure missed them. At the end of this post, I’ll share more close-ups of the caramel and chocolate I loved painting.Little Debbies Little Debbie's CremesPeanut Clusters line

This was my layout.

This was my layout.

There is definitely an "art" to taking a bite out of something I'm illustrating.

There is definitely an “art” to taking a bite out of something I’m illustrating.

Early in my career, I painted four labels for Little Debbie’s Snack Cakes. Once again, painting chocolate was fun and I had to resist snacking on my photo reference. Taking bites out of items was a whole other technique I developed!

The texture for chocolate definitely varied depending upon the product I was illustrating. Combining it with caramel or crispy rice, or shaving it for a curl was certainly different. And splashing, melted chocolate was probably the most difficult thing of all to illustrate.Caravellas line Peanut Bars

So for this post, as I share many different jobs that related to chocolate I also share one that was not successful. It was for a chocolate-raspberry product. The line sketch for my art direction looks fairly straightforward. The actual product was dark inside and not very appealing. My final artwork was my best effort, but ultimately was rejected by the client and I was only partially paid.Choc-rasp layout

This product was pretty challenging. I illustrated the raspberries separately.

This product was pretty challenging. I illustrated the raspberries separately.

I was told to put raspberries seeds in there.

I was told to put raspberries seeds in there and lighten the filling in contrast with the darker chocolate.

A fairly recent job of mine was for Kirkland/Costco. The illustration was for chocolate calcium chews. I share below my photo reference for the chews. I never liked illustrating splashes and was relieved that this one worked.Layout w. Kirkland Calcium Chews lines

On this one, I had a lot of photo reference to choose from.

On this one, I had a lot of photo reference to choose from.

Some of these paintings were rendered with markers and colored pencils and others were created with watercolor dyes. I have a blog where I describe my technique and have a lot more information. It is at: 

http://foodartist.wordpress.com

This is a super close-up of the texture on my Snicker's painting.

This is a super close-up of the texture on my Snicker’s painting.

Snickers Closeup 1

© 2014 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


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CANDYLAND – PART 1

Brach Candy Medley

I have already shared my illustration of Brach candies on 20 Lines. This painting was one I did for my own purposes – I call it a “portfolio piece.” Illustrating candy was enjoyable for me. I appreciated how colorful, reflective and tempting those items were that I was painting. I share below my illustration process with a painting I abandoned, photo reference and some close-ups.

Candy Medley in progress Candy Medley close up 2 Candy Medley close up 1 Candy closeup 2 

My own photo that I chose to work from.

My own photo that I chose to work from.

Creating portfolio paintings to showcase my ability led to paying jobs. My Brach candy portfolio painting brought me many other illustration assignments involving candy. For Part 1 of this post, I share some of those other candy jobs.

This is my photo reference pinned to a board.

This is my photo reference pinned to a board.

This is a marker sketch.

This is a marker sketch.

Taking my photo reference was also a creative process. When I illustrated a chocolate drop called “Dittos” I set up the candy on a board and pinned each one in a different perspective. Above is my photo reference for that assignment and the marker layout I created from it. I don’t have a scan of the final art or printed label for this job.

Looks like they picked "B."

Looks like they picked “B.” (Less drippy, though)

Creme de Menthe

Looks like "B" is the winner again!

Looks like “B” is the winner again! (This time it was drippy)

Creme de Menthe

Not as delicious, for sure!

I’m glad I could improve upon my photo!

I became adept at illustrating mint leaves and could do them from memory. Mint and chocolate were definitely an interesting contrast of dark and light. I am sharing many different mint-related illustrations and I’m even including a few line sketches.

That leaf needed a lot of improvement!

That leaf needed a lot of improvement!

Mint - Dubouchett Peppermint

A printed version of the mint.

A printed version of the mint.

Below are some miscellaneous jobs. Colorful candies like my cinnamon and butterscotch illustrations were far more exciting to illustrate than those brown root beer barrels. But I was proud of how realistic they were.

Butterscotch Hot Cinnamon Fruit Dinosaurs Root Beer Candies

And my broken chocolate egg for Dove was extremely difficult because of the embossed lettering on top. I only have the marker sketch below from that particular job.

Comp DoveOne day, I actually did receive an illustration assignment for Brach Candies. Thankfully by then, I had learned how to create rub-down letters through a photographic process to use on the wrappers. It was a relief that I didn’t have to paint those tiny letters with a brush!

 

This black and white photo-copy was the used to create a negative. Then rub-down letters could be made from it. With computers now it's far easier than it used to be!

This black and white photo-copy was the used to create a negative. Then rub-down letters could be made from it. With computers now it’s far easier than it used to be!

 

This is a color photo-copy of the final art showing the lettering on it.

This is a color photo-copy of the final art showing the lettering on it.

 

This is a color copy of a preliminary marker sketch.

This is a color copy of a preliminary marker sketch.

I have a blog where I describe my technique and have a lot more information. It is at:

http://foodartist.wordpress.com

  -

© Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


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A BUNCH OF CHERRIES

Cherry Group with Leaf

I am a food illustrator and have illustrated a lot of fruit. For this post I am sharing cherries. Cherries had challenges with the long and thin stems, which needed to be delicate and smooth. The dimension of a cherry was created with a bottom shadow and simple highlight.Cherries and Leaf Cherries A

It was important that the highlight wasn’t too perfect or the cherry would look like plastic. The cherries I illustrated were either bright red or a dark magenta to indicate “black cherry” flavor. Cherry leaves were interesting to paint because they had very serrated edges.Cherries Four Cherry Group Red Cherry Bunch 1 Cherry and Vanilla Cherries-Horizontal Group Cherries Cropped

For fun, I share a large fruit illustration that includes cherries. It was large because it would wrap around a jar for a jam label. The art director requested that my painting be done in a certain style.  I had to follow a certain color and texture for the leaves. And, I was told to have harsh shadows. Normally, I use reflected light on the edges of fruit and never let the shadow reach the edge. The effect was definitely interesting for me!Stylized Fruit Medley Fruit style w. cherry 3 Fruit style w. cherry 2 Fruit style w. cherry 1

My cherry illustrations were used on labels for yogurt, juice, jam and liqueur. There is one painting that was very unusual because it was for train car rentals.Take your pick Northland cherry label Mountain Sun Cherry Label Wegmans Cherry

I never liked painting clear liquid, but this painting was my best effort that I was pleased with. Close up Splash Cherry SplashSome of these paintings were rendered with markers and colored pencils and others were created with watercolor dyes. All of these paintings were done before Photoshop existed. I have a blog where I describe my technique and have a lot more information. It is at: 

http://foodartist.wordpress.com

© 2014 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


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ANYONE FOR ITALIAN FOOD?

Vegetable Medley

For over thirty years, I’ve illustrated food. When I first began my career, I had only a portfolio of paintings I created while in college. Let’s pretend the watercolor above is for an Italian soup! I was 18 years old when I painted it and copied a photo that I saw in a magazine. Later on, I used my own photographs.Pizza Billboard

I’ve enjoyed sharing jobs from my career. For this post, my subject is Italian food. And the billboard above happens to be one of the very first jobs I received after I graduated college in 1981.

Pizza Pan

The painting was fairly large and a lot more work went into before it was cropped off! I did prepare a custom pizza and sadly did not satisfy the art director with enough drips of cheese. Somehow, he found a way to add them. Years later, I illustrated another slice of pizza with cheese dripping and this time I made sure the drips were emphasized.
Pizza & Slice

My job always started with the art director’s layout. Then I took a photograph for my reference (notice how I burned the pizza crust?). Good thing that I saved the spatula from my first pizza job years earlier.

Griffith Labs Layout Griffith Labs Photo Ref

 I traced my photo and sent line drawings to the art director. After that, I created a marker sketch that was usually very realistic. I’ve actually made some of my marker renderings into final illustrations.Pizza Pan 1

When I had to illustrate a pizza inside of a stopwatch, I dreaded illustrating the watch. It was far easier to illustrate something organic instead of perfectly round and shiny metal.

pizza layoutEagle Pizza ref

I always found comments made by the art director to be interesting.

I always found comments made by the art director to be interesting.

But I closely followed my reference and relied on an old-fashioned airbrush to achieve perfect gradations.Pizza Stopwatch

One of my larger packaging assignments was for the food manufacturer, Ragu. I created approximately 25 labels for their Italian sauces. I share some marker sketches; printed labels and even an original painting taken from a scan of an old slide. I was definitely tired of mushrooms and onions when I finished that painting!

This is taken from a color photocopy.

This is taken from a color photocopy.

Ragu- 8 w. slides  

This was a marker layout.

This was a marker layout.

Mushroom and Onions Horizontal

Below is another assignment for Chef Boyardee. I did not illustrate the ravioli and my paintings needed to be very photorealistic since the photo would be in front of them. My painting images were scanned from color photocopies and not the best representation of my work.Chef Boyardi Tearsheet Chef - parm. yellow Chef - meat in back Chef - meat front Chef - black top cheese

And my last illustration was taken from a series of labels for flavored non-stick sprays. The flavor was olive oil spray, which doesn’t sound very appealing to me.Pasta with Salt and Pepper

I have a lot more information about my illustration career on my blog “Illustrating My Life,” which can be found at this link:

http://foodartist.wordpress.com/ 

© 2014 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

 


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I AM A SANDWICH

This is my favorite painting of a sandwich, which I created in order to add to my portfolio. Below my illustration is the actual photo of a sandwich that I assembled. How in the world would anyone bite into it?Sandwich Sandwich photo ref

For over thirty years, I’ve illustrated food. I’ve enjoyed sharing jobs from my career. Because I’ve illustrated so many fruits, it was easy to sort them by name. For this post, I am sharing sandwiches and even fit a s’more illustration for Honey Maid into this category.

On an advertisement for Pro Write software, I was instructed to place a package in the foreground. Later on, I painted a mouse pad to replace that part of my illustration. It made it handy so that I could market the painting in my stock library.

Pro Write softwareEach element of my painting required a lot of research and good reference. Even the pink message needed to look as if had writing on it in perspective. I enjoyed the luminescence of the soda, and hated painting the watch dial. I was proud of the rye bread and the realism of it with the seeds.

Sandwich, Soda, & Mouse Pad revisedSandwich, Soda, & Mouse Pad revisedWhen I was given the assignment to create a s’more – it was lucrative based on the fact that I only had 4 days to complete it. I have scanned the art director’s layout as well as the printed version. I was surprise how a box was inserted behind the plate on the left side, which certainly was not correct perspective by any means. But the background also had a weird look.

This was the art director's layout.

This was the art director’s layout.

As a result of this job, I learned how to microwave a perfect s’more. My own children screamed watching marshmallows blow up in the microwave after 10 seconds.Honeymaid S'more Final art

The printed version with a strange perspective.

The printed version with a strange perspective.

I share another illustration for Honey Maid, which also had an intensely difficult deadline. I searched far and wide to find a specific style of lunch box that the client wanted. It was interesting to illustrate another illustration on the box. I used a toothbrush to splatter watercolor paint in order to achieve the graham cracker texture.Honeymaid fihal art

The printed advertisement.

The printed advertisement.

This roast beef sandwich was one of my first paintings that I did when I first started my career. I certainly improved painting water droplets after many years of practice.Roast Beef SandwichBelow is a marker comp for a job that was never finalized. That often happened with many jobs, especially when a product was still being formulated.Sandwich-Salad MedleyThis illustration was very complex. It was an assignment to create a cover for a bread machine recipe book. For some reason, I never received a copy of the printed book, which I probably pursued relentlessly.Bread & Carbs close up breads even closer breadsEarly in my career, I created many illustrations that were used on a menu. I never received copies so one day I ate at the restaurant and swiped a few menus. Although I felt guilty, it was vindication because the art director tricked me. I gave up rights to my original art when I cashed the check because he wrote something on the back with those words. Unfortunately, I didn’t pay close enough attention because I was in such a hurry to deposit the check.

This job was done a long time ago and I feel old seeing those prices.

This job was done a long time ago and I feel old seeing those prices.

Spires Menu 2

I included this, even though I plan to have another post of just my burger paintings!

I included this, even though I plan to have another post of just my burger paintings!

Later in my career, a fabric company bought existing art to design a deli fabric. It was eventually used on aprons, pot holders and towels. I did not make much money and even paid for a bunch of samples because I thought they would make terrific gifts. I even use them!Deli Fabric My deli assortment

I have a lot more information about my illustration career on my blog “Illustrating My Life,” which can be found at this link: http://foodartist.wordpress.com/

© 2014 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


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LAYERS IN MY LIFE

Perfume MedleyArt is my profession; music is my passion.

Art and music are two creative pursuits that define my life. I realize that I didn’t include writing. I’ll save that for another story, because writing is definitely my remedy! There are many similarities between art and music for me. The most obvious parallel would be “layers.”

Every illustration I create starts with layers. The order, selection and placement of those layers affect the outcome. Each layer befriends the layer beside it. When I painted with watercolors, colors were transparent veils that I gradually built upon.

Perfume Close up 2

I am now primarily a digital illustrator. I separate every item in the composition on my computer. Then I arrange those items to fit comfortably into the label area I’m illustrating. I use whatever reference I can find and often shoot my own photos with an inexpensive digital camera. 

Below is an example of my digital process. I was still teaching myself how to do this when I illustrated a label for the salad company, Ready Pac. My illustration was for a Caesar salad dressing label and the ingredients needed to be arranged in a specific way to fit the space.

My photo of the ingredients.

My photo of the ingredients.


My final illustration (the lemon was taken out).

My final illustration (the lemon was taken out).

ready-pac-labels 

With music, the ingredients are the lyrics, chords and my vocal – all of which are deeply defined by me. 

Music has layers, just as an illustration does. Clearly defined layers comprise my song’s arrangement. Arrangements are simply layers (or separate tracks) of instrumentation and include my vocal and guitar recordings. 

I love composing music and sometimes it begins with a melody. Other times, I’ll write chords or lyrics first. Putting those layers together is a beautiful process that I find completely inspiring.

Music layers are visible as colored stripes on the computer program Pro Tools. I have learned to read and edit waveforms.

Music layers are visible as colored stripes on the computer program Pro Tools. I have learned to read and edit waveforms.

With art, I strive relentlessly to please my clients and that can involve numerous revisions to an illustration. With music, I strive to please myself. There is even a similarity between those because it is a relentless task. I am very demanding of myself!

My final illustration of Marion Berries. The client was very particular about the color of this berry.

My final illustration of Marion Berries. The client was very particular about the color of this berry.

 

Marion Berry ideas

When I shared my illustrations with a few friends, I received a message back that left me in hysterics. It was: 

Close, but this is Marion Barry….

Marion Berry

I far prefer illustrating a pepper like this one.

I far prefer illustrating a pepper like this one.


These peppers are a lot prettier!

These peppers are a lot prettier!

“Hot Stuff”

Sometimes on illustration assignments I am required to sign confidentiality agreements. Even though I haven’t had to on my recent projects, in the interest of being discreet I won’t name the clients I’m working for.

I have learned a lot as an illustrator. I received a small assignment to create two illustrations to go on a pizza box. One was for garlic and the other chipotle. For the garlic flavor, I already had existing art that could be used.

Garlic

But for the chipotle flavor I had to create new art. Rarely is that required of me, since I have such an extensive library of existing food images. So now, I am intimately acquainted with Chipotle peppers. They were a lot harder to illustrate than I thought. It was because they were incredibly ugly and no actual reference existed!

Every job of mine begins with finding reference. I contacted the art director after going to a local Latino market looking for an example of chipotle peppers. I told her that I couldn’t find any actual peppers to work from. It seemed that they only existed as a picture on a can. And inside the can, those peppers were soaked in Adobo sauce. I needed something better than that to work from.

So she emailed me a picture that I will name “Pepper Corpses.”

Pepper Corpses

I couldn’t believe it – how in world would I illustrate peppers looking like that? 

It was time for me to be truly creative. I remembered seeing dried peppers at the Latino market. I would just go back and find something “similar.” I must mention that I was also searching for reference on another assignment. I needed items of caramel, chocolate and ice cream. For a few weeks I became a supermarket sleuth! My dining room table was covered with illustration reference. 

Unfortunately, the peppers I found did not really match the shape or color. Some were very tiny, long and a bright red color. Others were longer, wider and brown in color. I altered my photos and tried to match the photo of pepper corpses above. I then shot them off to the Art Director, whom I will call AD.

First Pepper reference

AD sent me back more photo reference.

Art direction

Aha! Now I was on the right track! Once again, I went back to the Latino Market and went through all the bins of dried peppers while holding a color copy of those images above. The penny was helpful for size, but there was still nothing that matched. But I knew with Photoshop I could do wonders. 

As I was walking toward the checkout line, there was another bin. Wallah! There were peppers that really seemed close to what AD wanted. Hint: They were not Chipotle.

Chipotle reference

I began my digital work and delicately erased the background and arranged the peppers into different compositions. I sent my layout choices off to the AD.

Chipotle Comps

The AD picked B. But now, the color had changed. Brown or eggplant color was out and I was instructed to create something with a deep red. I created another layout on my computer.

Final Layout

My layout was approved! I felt like I saw peppers in my sleep by now. My eyes burned because I rubbed them by mistake while I was photographing the dried peppers. I forgot how potent those peppers were! 

The process of creating my illustration was usually simple at this point. I printed out my image onto watercolor paper and worked over it. I used a lot of colored pencil, especially on the highlight areas that were numerous and too busy.

Sometimes my illustrations feel very abstract when viewed as a close-up.

Sometimes my illustrations feel very abstract when viewed as a close-up.

I sent off the final art and it was a relief. I always looked forward to the message telling me my artwork was approved and that I could send an invoice. I held my breath. 

The AD sent me a message with a tiny revision. It wasn’t difficult with my computer to alter the artwork. But of course, I thought, “Why didn’t she see that sooner?”

Fix

I made the small change and then I received her message below: 

Judy! Client loves the work and is so thankful we talked them into illustration vs. photography. All approved!! : ) 

THANK YOU SO MUCH again for jumping on this! Shoot over your invoice and I’ll get it into accounting right away. Yippeee! 

I wrote back: 

Wow! You just made my day. :) :) :) 

After illustrating peppers, I feel like I’m hot stuff.

Judy

Chipotle Pepper Final Art

I have a lot more information about my illustration career on my blog “Illustrating My Life,” which can be found at this link: http://foodartist.wordpress.com

© 2013 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


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VEGETABLES-PART 2

Vegetable Group

For over thirty years, I’ve illustrated food. This is my second post of illustrations with veggies.

Most of these paintings were created before the digital age. But one of the best tools that taught me how to utilize the computer, were scans of my existing images. I was able to digitally select and separate images in order to create samples of my work. (The Italian subject was not strictly veggies, but I included it for fun.

Salsa top Salsa bottom Italian

The only painting that is a result of working digitally is the nacho cheese and jalapenos. I created my painting first on the computer. I painted with watercolors over a light print of that illustration.

Nacho Cheese & Chips

This illustration of tomatoes below is actually a digital reconfiguration of tomatoes from several different paintings. When I “reconfigure” a painting, I try to be sure that the color, lighting and shadows are consistent.

Tomato Group

Another one of my "reconfigured" paintings.

Another one of my “reconfigured” paintings.

Some of my illustrations (Salsa Verde, corn and avocados) were actually created as marker layouts.

Corn Avocados Salsa Verde-Ingredients

Since my career spanned over thirty years, I clearly see a lot of development with my style. Some clients demanded extreme realism, whereas other clients preferred a specific style.Vegetable Juice Group Salsa ingredients Salsa Horiz. 2 Salsa Horiz. 1 Beet Medley

Below are examples of some of my vegetable illustrations on printed labels:

Vegetable-Cooking Group Ragu Soybeans Hanging Soy Label Tostitos-horiz Spice Islands Chef Boyardi Carrots Orange Carrot

I have a lot more information about my illustration career on my blog “Illustrating My Life,” which can be found at this link: http://foodartist.wordpress.com

© 2013 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


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VEGETABLES – PART 1

Taco SceneFor over thirty years, I’ve illustrated food.Because I have a lot of illustrations with veggies, I am breaking them into several posts. All of these paintings were created before the digital age.Taco Scene Close up 1Taco Scene Close up 2Some of these illustrations are actually marker layouts, while others are watercolor paintings. I am including some close-ups. Since my career spanned over thirty years, I clearly see a lot of development with my style. Some clients demanded extreme realism, whereas other clients preferred a specific style. SandwichIt is definitely cool to go into the market and purchase pickles with my illustration on the label. Sometimes, I can’t resist telling the checker in the supermarket that I painted that pickle on the label. There’s never a “dill moment” for me.Ragu Labels

This was a marker sketch and not a finished illustration.

Vegetable Medley

Salsa ingredients-aerial view

Produce Medley Produce Medley close up 2 Produce Medley close up 1

I did relish doing this job.

I did relish doing this job.

Chicken Plate & Fork

Whoever thought turkey drumsticks were cute?

Whoever thought turkey drumsticks were cute?

For this lucrative assignment, I illustrated over one hundred labels.

For this lucrative assignment, I illustrated over one hundred labels.

I have a lot more information about my illustration career on my blog “Illustrating My Life,” which can be found at this link: http://foodartist.wordpress.com 

 

© 2013 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Ponderosa Lemon


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CITRUS FRUIT

Ponderosa Lemon

I have been a food artist for over 30 years.

Yellow Grapefruit ClusterLemon Final Tangerine Group

I have many illustrations of citrus fruit, and have already shared a post of just oranges. So now I’m sharing lemons, limes, tangerines and grapefruits. (I threw in one orange and a few strawberries).

Lime Peel 1 Peel Yellow

I enjoy rendering citrus fruit. I start by creating a pattern of circles and “half moons” that radiate from the highlight area to replicate the citrus peel texture.

Orange Group 1 Key Lime Final Strawberry-Lemon FinalLimes Lemon  Lemon groupGrapefruit Pink    Lemon Group of 7Grapefruit & Tangerine

The illustrations for this post were used on labels for beverages, popsicles and jam.

Some of them were rendered with markers and colored pencils while others were created with watercolor dyes. The peel texture was created using acrylics and a glazing technique, which I describe on my other blog at this link:

http://foodartist.wordpress.com/2010/05/31/317/

 Grapefruit YellowGrapefruit Pink with BlossomsLemon D

© 2013 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com  http://foodartist.wordpress.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Echinacea 2


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HERBAL REMEDIES – PART 1

Echinacea 2

For this post I am sharing illustrations of herbs with medicinal purposes. Most of these paintings were used on vitamin labels. Only one (Aloe) was used for a label on a soap product. I’ve included close-ups and even some sketches I sent to my client to decide upon the layout.

Echinacia side view Pharmavite 2 Saw Palmetto

An example of hor my illustrations were printed.

An example of hor my illustrations were printed.


Herb-Ginko #1 Ginseng 2ValerianValerian Label Goldenseal
Goldenseal Echinacea label

Bilberry Green Tea Cascara Sagrada Bark
Evening Primrose close up Red Ginseng  Herb-Saffron flower Herb-Aloe St. John's WortSketch St. John's Horse Chestnut SeedSketch Horse ChestnutMilk Thistleclose up Milk Thistle
Black Cohosh Turmeric Anise

For over thirty years, I’ve illustrated food. I have a blog where I describe my technique and have a lot more information. It is at: 

http://foodartist.wordpress.com

© 2013 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Berries Mixed Medley


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BERRY WITH ME

 

Berries Mixed Medley

I have illustrated fruit for over thirty years. For this post, I’m sharing berries. Some of these illustrations were used to indicate berry flavor on labels for yogurt, juice, liqueur, sorbet and vitamins. I have so many illustrations of fruit that I’ve already had separate posts on strawberries and blueberries. These are some of the remaining illustrations that I wanted to share. Certainly within the raspberry family – there are many color variations of color.

Stylized Fruit

Although much of my work is realistic, there are many different ways to illustrate fruit. On the painting above, I was specifically asked to illustrate a medley of fruit in a “Renaissance” style. The leaves had to be painted with certain colors and the lighting did not have any reflected light on the edges of the fruit.

Stylized Fruit close-up

Stylized Fruit close-up 2

I enjoyed replicating different styles to please my clients. Below are more of my illustrations and I have included some close ups.

Yogurt carton Raspberry Raspberry Final Raspberry 2 Raspberry Raspberries Three Raspberries Large Group Raspberries Four Marion Berry Marion Berry Final Cranberry Branch Curved Cranberries with Twig & Leaves Blackberry pair Black Currents Berry Patch Berries CroppedWegmans labels Northland labels

Some of these paintings were rendered with markers and colored pencils. Others were created with watercolor dyes. I have a blog where I describe my technique and have a lot more information. It is at: 

http://foodartist.wordpress.com

© 2013 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

CREME DE MENTHE - Liqueur Label


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FLAVORS IN MY LIFE

CREME DE MENTHE - Liqueur Label

CREME DE MENTHE – Liqueur Label

For this post I am sharing a variety of illustrations.  I’m simply going to title them and list what product they were used for. At first, I wasn’t going to include any paintings of fruit because I’ve already shared so many on Twenty Lines. But with the title of flavors, I simply couldn’t omit cherry! When I illustrated sour flavors for a liqueur line, it was interesting to create splashes with sour candy balls erupting from fruit. It’s interesting now, but probably wasn’t that much fun when I painted them many years ago.

SOUR APPLE - Liqueur Label

SOUR APPLE – Liqueur Label

SOUR PEACH - Liqueur Label

SOUR PEACH – Liqueur Label

CHERRY - Yogurt Label

CHERRY – Yogurt Label

HOT CINNAMON - Liqueur Label

HOT CINNAMON – Liqueur Label

COCONUT - Yogurt Label

COCONUT – Yogurt Label

PEPPERMINT - Liqueur Label

PEPPERMINT – Liqueur Label

MINT PATTIES - Liqueur Label

MINT PATTIES – Liqueur Label

ROOT BEER - Liqueur Label

ROOT BEER – Liqueur Label

CACAO - Liqueur Label

CACAO – Liqueur Label

SPEARMINT - Liqueur Label

SPEARMINT – Liqueur Label

ROSEMARY - Potato Chip Label

ROSEMARY – Potato Chip Label

COOKIES & CREAM - Snack Crisp Label

COOKIES & CREAM – Snack Crisp Label

NACHO CHEESE - Snack Crisp Label

NACHO CHEESE – Snack Crisp Label

 

KEY LIME - Yogurt Label

KEY LIME – Yogurt Label

CINNAMON - Snack Crisp Label

CINNAMON – Snack Crisp Label

OREGANO - Bagel Packaging

OREGANO – Bagel Packaging

MINT - Tea Packaging

MINT – Tea Packaging

GINGER - Herbal Vitamin Label

GINGER – Herbal Vitamin Label

BASIL - Bagel Packaging

BASIL – Bagel Packaging

GARLIC - Bagel Packaging

GARLIC – Bagel Packaging

GARLIC - Snack Crisp Packaging

GARLIC – Snack Crisp Packaging

VANILLA - Soy Milk Packaging

VANILLA – Soy Milk Packaging

CINNAMON - Bagel Packaging

CINNAMON – Bagel Packaging

COFFEE - Yogurt Label

COFFEE – Yogurt Label

BUTTERSCOTCH - Liqueur Label

BUTTERSCOTCH – Liqueur Label

CHOCOLATE - Beverage Label

CHOCOLATE – Beverage Label

VANILLA - Yogurt Label

VANILLA – Yogurt Label

GREEN TEA - Herbal Vitamin Label

GREEN TEA – Herbal Vitamin Label

LEMON - Yogurt Label

LEMON – Yogurt Label

PASSION, ORANGE & GUAVA - Yogurt Label

PASSION, ORANGE & GUAVA – Yogurt Label

ORANGE CREAM - Yogurt Label

ORANGE CREAM – Yogurt Label

GUARANA - Beverage Label This was one of the strangest fruits I illustrated and it grows in Central America. Highly caffeinated.

GUARANA – Beverage Label
This was one of the strangest fruits I illustrated and it grows in Central America. It is highly caffeinated.

For over thirty years, I’ve illustrated food. I have a blog where I describe my technique and have a lot more information. It is at: 

http://foodartist.wordpress.com

© 2013 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 


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LETTUCE EAT SALAD

Salad Tossed

For over thirty years, I’ve illustrated food. I wanted to name my post “turning over a new leaf,” because I’ve embraced music as my passion now. But I chose a different title because I am still illustrating food. I also enjoy sharing the many illustrations that I have created over the course of my career.

Not a salad, but colorful and fun to share. This illustration was commissioned for a cafeteria company.

Not a salad, but colorful and fun to share. This illustration was commissioned for a cafeteria company.

For me, illustrating salad was a joy. The textures and colors intrigued me and reference was readily available. The challenges for me were the non-organic elements, such as bowls, plates, and bottles. Two of the earliest jobs of my career were for California’s Iceberg Lettuce Commission. I created two posters and later on a brochure.Salad Poster

The instructions for those illustrations were clearly outlined by the art. It was always helpful for me to receive such precise instructions to follow. Below, I share examples of marker sketches that were very important before I proceeded to final paintings. I hated to make changes to final art and the marker sketch gave me useful feedback, as well as reassuring the clients as to how my illustration would appear.

This is an example of another usage for my illustration purchased through a stock agency.

This is an example of another usage for my illustration purchased through a stock agency.

This is an example of my salad poster painting in progress. It was actually a teaching example from the time when I was an instructor.

This painting in progress shows my watercolor technique. I did this as an example when I was an art instructor.

This is a marker sketch.

This is a marker sketch.

Salad Bar

This is the printed poster.

This is the printed poster.

On a project for Borden, I photographed my own hand – I thought it would be easy to create the fingernail, even though I didn’t have a long one. The art director made a comment, “Hand looks too heavy, can you make it more slender?” OUCH!Salad Borden comp Borden Comp w. Comments Salad Dressing Bordens

I especially enjoyed working for Ready Pac, Co. My first illustration was for their Spinach Salad Kit. I was only required to illustrate the package elements, not the salad.I completed the marker comp and received delayed feedback that the dressing needed to be lighter and more translucent. The client wanted the spices to be visibly floating in the dressing. I had already begun painting, so I stopped what I was working on and began again. I had to take new reference photos to help me. Solving the texture for the croutons was fun for me. I used colored pencils to achieve the “roughness.”
Ready pac Labels

I always gave my clients choices with sketches. It's much easier with a computer now!

I always gave my clients choices with sketches. It’s much easier with a computer now!

I ended up making the dressing more transluscent.

I ended up making the dressing more transluscent.

This is a marker sketch.

This is a marker sketch.

An example of my photo reference.

An example of my photo reference.

Ready Pac Spinach

Subsequent jobs for Ready Pac incorporated my own unique digital process. I worked with my computer to create something that I could lightly print out onto watercolor paper. I painted over the print with watercolors.

Caesar Lite Asian Salad kit art Asian

Parisian salad kit art

ParisianSalad Trays Ready Pak

I share now more illustrations for salad packaging that I created over the span of my career.

Salad Sensations Henri's dressing

An example of my job layout.

An example of my job layout.

A close up.

A close up.

Salad Horiz Best Foods dressing 

I have a lot more information about my illustration career on my blog “Illustrating My Life,” which can be found at this link:

http://foodartist.wordpress.com/

 

© 2013 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. 


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ORANGES ARE APPEALING

 

Oranges with Center BlossomFor over thirty years, I’ve illustrated food. I loved the challenge of rendering fruit; each variety had beautiful colors and textures to capture. All of these paintings were done before Photoshop existed.Orange Border Orange Frame Orange, Wedge, and BlossomOrange Stock Usage

With citrus fruit and oranges, I created a pattern of circles and “half moons” that radiated from the highlight in order to replicate the orange peel texture.

Orange, Wedge, & Blossom

Appealing

This is one of my earliest watercolors of oranges for Sundance Beverages. It is purely with watercolor and doesn't utilize the acrylic glazing that I developed later on.

This is one of my earliest watercolors of oranges for Sundance Beverages. It is purely with watercolor and doesn’t utilize the acrylic glazing that I developed later on.

I have so many illustrations of citrus fruit, that I am dividing them into categories and plan to share lemons, limes and grapefruits on another post.

Orange CremeOrange CarrotOrange Carrot Label Southern Home

The illustrations I am sharing below were primarily used on labels for orange juice. The others were used for beverages, baby food, Popsicles and jam.

Orange drink  Orange Whole with Wedge and HalfOrange Group Orange Group 1 Oranges with leaves

Most of these paintings were rendered with markers and colored pencils and others were created with watercolor dyes. I share more about creating the orange peel texture using airbrush acrylics and a glazing technique at my other blog link below:

http://foodartist.wordpress.com/2010/05/31/317/

 

© 2013 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


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FEELING PEACHY

              Peaches-Horizontal Group             

For over thirty years, I’ve illustrated food. I loved the challenge of rendering fruit; each variety had beautiful colors and textures to capture.

Peach Fuzz

With peaches, I always used an opaque medium (usually colored pencil) for the reflected light at the edges of the fruit. This gave the impression of “fuzz” because opaque mediums have a bluish cast.

This was one of my earliest jobs of my career. The fruit is very stylized here.

This was one of my earliest jobs of my career. The fruit is very stylized here.

Rousseau FruitThe illustrations I am sharing below were used on labels to indicate peach flavor for bath soap, baby food, sour candy, tea, yogurt, beverages, jam, wine cooler and sorbet.

Peach and half Peaches Two Peach Group with Pit Peach Branch Peaches Cropped Peaches and wedges

This illustration is currently on jars of Beechnut Baby Food.

This illustration is currently on jars of Beechnut Baby Food.

Peach & Candy SplashPeach Juicy Peach Group Peach with Stem

Just for fun, I’ve included some other fruit images in addition to peaches on labels groupings.

A marker layout in progress.

A marker layout in progress.

Before creating my final painting, I always provided sketches to my clients.

Before creating my final painting, I always provided sketches to my clients.

Peach Tea

This was a recent illustration.

This was a recent illustration.

Peaches VerticalRemarkable LabelsPeach Frame
Randall's Jams 6Peaches, Strawberries, and Blueberries

These paintings were rendered with markers, colored pencils and/or watercolor dyes. My motto is “whatever works.” I have a blog where I describe my technique and have a lot more information. It is at: 

http://foodartist.wordpress.com

© 2013 by Judy Unger, http://www.myjourneysinsight.com and 20 Lines A Day. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Judy Unger with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 
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